Thursday, July 13, 2017

BLOG: Beavercreek Golf Club, Beavercreek, Ohio


This summer, the Groundwater Blog will be profiling participants of the Groundwater Guardian Green Site program. The program recognizes green spaces (golf courses, parks, nature areas, educational and office campuses, etc.) for using groundwater-friendly practices to maintain the site. Find out more.




Site: City of Beavercreek, Beavercreek Golf Club
Site Manager: Zach Wike, Assistant Golf Course Superintendent



Tell us a little about your site and its history
Beavercreek Golf Club is owned and operated by the City of Beavercreek. It opened for play in 1996. Environmental stewardship is a top priority, and we have been a Certified Audubon Cooperative Sanctuary since 2014. 

What’s the most unique feature of your site? 
The 180 acre golf course is set amongst rolling hills and is comprised of many different ecosystems. The golf course is responsible for handling a lot of storm water from surrounding properties during rain events. Through pond and stream bank naturalization, we are able to filter much of the water before it leaves the property and flows into nearby wetlands. 

What groundwater-friendly practices are you most proud of?
We have greatly reduced the fertilization totals on property over the last few years. Providing enough fertility for a healthy stand of turf is essential for creating a natural filter, however, we utilize soil and tissue testing to apply fertilizer precisely as its needed as to eliminate or reduce any runoff or leaching.  

What would you tell another site manager about being a Green Site? 
Being a Green Site is valuable as it ensures proper practices are in place to protect groundwater. Many of the practices that site managers have in place are already beneficial to groundwater. This program ensures that site managers take into account all practices that impact groundwater and make the necessary changes to protect against groundwater pollution. It is also a great certification to show off to all stakeholders.

What’s the best part about your job?
The best part about my job is being able to see the sunrise every morning. It is certainly a view that never gets old. That coupled with working with nature is a very rewarding experience.

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Zach Wike has been the Course Superintendent at Lake Tahoe Golf Course for eight years. Find out more about Beavercreek Golf Club by visiting www.beavercreekgolfclub.com or wike@beavercreekohio.gov.  Follow him on Twitter at @zachwike.

Wednesday, July 12, 2017

It's Water-Wise Wednesday with Frannie the Fish! {Mulch}

Evaporation happens when water is heated enough to turn into a gas and expand into the atmosphere.  When Frannie is gardening, she wants to make sure that her plants get enough water but that it’s not wasted by evaporating in the hot summer sun.

In the past, she learned the best times of the day to water are dawn and dusk when it isn’t so hot.  But there’s another common and inexpensive option that she’d like to share with you: Mulch.

Mulch is a material that you use to cover the soil around your plants. Many people use it in landscaping because it comes in a variety of colors and textures, but it also does several important things to help keep your plants healthy and strong.
  1. Evaporation Prevention. This is one of the most important purposes mulch serves in this hot weather. Mulch absorbs the heat from the sun and prevents it from reaching the soil that the plant is growing in. Because the soil is cooler, it is able to take in and retain more moisture than it would were it exposed.
  2. Weed Prevention. No one likes weeds.  They take up all the water and good nutrients in the soil that we want for our own flowers and food.  Mulch, by stopping the sunlight from reaching the ground, starves out weeds and they are unable to grow in that area. It also stops any new seeds from landing in your garden.
  3. Soil Improvement. Ok, so we know that the soil in our garden is cooler with more moisture and fewer weeds, but it also builds up the soil.  All types of mulch prevent the wind from eroding the soil but organic or natural mulch can go one step further by enhancing the soil with nutrients as they decompose.  An area mulched with pine needles, for example, becomes acidic as the mulch decomposes and becomes suited for acid-loving plants like azaleas. 
Try using mulch this summer and let us know how it goes on our Facebook, Twitter, or send us an email. Happy Gardening!

Wednesday, July 5, 2017

BLOG: Lake Tahoe Golf Course, California


This summer, the Groundwater Blog will be profiling participants of the Groundwater Guardian Green Site program. The program recognizes green spaces (golf courses, parks, nature areas, educational and office campuses, etc.) for using groundwater-friendly practices to maintain the site. Find out more.




Site: Lake Tahoe Golf Course, South Lake Tahoe, California

Site Manager: Bobby Jaeger, Golf Course Superintendent



Tell us a little about your site and its history. 
Our golf course was built in 1959. The land the Golf Course is on was purchased by California State Parks in the 1980’s, from there California State Parks hired American Golf Corporation to manage the property and has since been a huge success, attracting golfers from all over the world.

What’s the most unique feature of your site? 
The Upper Truckee River runs through the Golf Course. It is the largest tributary into Lake Tahoe. It makes the course challenging to play, provides habitat for wildlife, and makes for a scenic golf outing.


What groundwater-friendly practices are you most proud of? 
Our very limited use of fertilizers. We never fertilize the rough or native areas. Our tees and fairways get half the text-book recommended amounts of NPK  per growing season, and our greens are primarily fed from liquid foliar applications. Thus greatly reducing any chance of run off or leaching into ground or surface waters.

What would you tell another site manager about being a Green Site? 
It helps educate people in your community about what you do at your property and lets them know about your efforts in environmental stewardship.

What’s the best part about your job? 
The best part of my job is not only working outside in Lake Tahoe and providing great golf conditions for locals and visitors from all over the world, but knowing that my environmental stewardship efforts help in ensuring Lake Tahoe is clear and blue for many generations to come.

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Bobby Jaeger has been the Course Superintendent at Lake Tahoe Golf Course for five years. Find out more about Lake Tahoe Golf Course at www.laketahogc.com or super@laketahoegc.com